56074 - Tópico: Portuguese culture  (Lida 27227 vezes)

fyure

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 17:16
In my town we have as a traditional dish roasted lamb (cabrito assado). It is served with potatoes and sautéed greens - I used google translator for this, the portuguese name is 'grelos salteados'. 'Grelo' also could mean cunt. Portuguese language is tricky ;D


brankinho_gaspar

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 17:19
I love sautéed cunts.

fyure

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 17:32
I love sautéed cunts.
But you love sausage too...

Faliro

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 18:20
Stone soup??  :huh:
Yup. Sopa da pedra, the portuguese name. It is a soup made manly of meat, pork meat, chorizo (chouriço), pudding (morcela, negra, farinheira), and some other things like potatoes and red beans. It is the traditional dish of Almeirim, in the province of Ribatejo. I'm from another city from this pronvince and we eat it some times too.



The name cames frome a legend. It is said that the recipe was given by a friar who carried a stone on his bad. Every time he had to eat during his pilgrimage, he asked people to let him go inside their homes and prepare a soup mad of the stone he had. Then he asked for other condiments and the soup would be done. The stone, it self, was only an excuse to people let him try to make that soup. How can he make a soup out of a stone ? Well, i fact he couldn't, it was only a way to provide him the necessary to make a really good soup.

People still usually put a stone on the pan, or in the terrine were the soup is served.

Isn't it mad to put a stone in there/ For the teeth etc?

fyure

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 18:27
Stone soup??  :huh:
Yup. Sopa da pedra, the portuguese name. It is a soup made manly of meat, pork meat, chorizo (chouriço), pudding (morcela, negra, farinheira), and some other things like potatoes and red beans. It is the traditional dish of Almeirim, in the province of Ribatejo. I'm from another city from this pronvince and we eat it some times too.



The name cames frome a legend. It is said that the recipe was given by a friar who carried a stone on his bad. Every time he had to eat during his pilgrimage, he asked people to let him go inside their homes and prepare a soup mad of the stone he had. Then he asked for other condiments and the soup would be done. The stone, it self, was only an excuse to people let him try to make that soup. How can he make a soup out of a stone ? Well, i fact he couldn't, it was only a way to provide him the necessary to make a really good soup.

People still usually put a stone on the pan, or in the terrine were the soup is served.

Isn't it mad to put a stone in there/ For the teeth etc?
It is a big stone. There's no chance to eat it. It is just to create an apresentation of the dish.

tjbc

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 18:29
Faliro, from my hometown (Viseu):

Rancho


Faliro

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 18:35
The tubes are penne?

tjbc

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 18:36
Yes! It usually surprises everyone, but pasta is quite traditional in Portugal

pcssousa

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 18:50
Sundays? Time to eat cozido à portuguesa and listen to the heart and soul of Portugal, Carlos Paredes and his Portuguese Guitar (in fact, he played a Coimbra Guitar, wich is similar but has some light differences in sonority).




Paredes is a true legend, the best ever, by far.

fyure

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 18:53
Sundays? Time to eat cozido à portuguesa and listen to the heart and soul of Portugal, Carlos Paredes and his Portuguese Guitar (in fact, he played a Coimbra Guitar, wich is similar but has some light differences in sonority).




Paredes is a true legend, the best ever, by far.
Part of the portuguese way of life...


Faliro

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 18:56
The Cozido looks very healthy.

Sundays? Time to eat cozido à portuguesa

You just reminded me, in Brazil there is an amazing pizza variation that i usually order called the portuguesa,



In Minas Gerias, they also add catupiry  sometimes... and that is a fucking good pizza.
« Última modificação: 15 de Setembro de 2014, 18:58 por Faliro »

brankinho_gaspar

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 19:00


Oh yeah.
Melhor arroz de tomate do Mundo.

Faliro

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 19:00
listen to the heart and soul of Portugal, Carlos Paredes and his Portuguese Guitar (in fact, he played a Coimbra Guitar, wich is similar but has some light differences in sonority).



Beautiful music. Very relaxing. Tell me what you of this:


Faliro

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Oh yeah.
Melhor arroz de tomate do Mundo.

Is that breaded cod fish on the left?

brankinho_gaspar

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  • 15 de Setembro de 2014, 19:05
I need the help of google translate on this one.

On the left is breaded pork. Those 4 smaller things are called codfish cakes. I assume that's what you called breaded cod fish  O0
Fresch cheese, morcela, hake fillets.
But the best is this:


That rice is too die for.