53783 - Tópico: Olympiacos Piraeus  (Lida 284692 vezes)

Faliro

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  • 01 de Abril de 2019, 17:55
Tough game vs Atromitos, but we won 2-1. Was not easy.

Gil Dias was not bad, but I spose my take away from the game is how every now and again, Hellas produces women that look like this:

https://youtu.be/uU9OmH1j98U?t=103

StellaRojas

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  • 02 de Abril de 2019, 13:42
Read this?

<br /><br />

Faliro

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  • 02 de Abril de 2019, 19:24
Read this?

<br /><br />

Nonsense article with many inaccuracies.

Festivus

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  • 02 de Abril de 2019, 19:26
Faliro, how good is your Portuguese? What do you find easy and hard about it?

Faliro

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  • 02 de Abril de 2019, 21:11
Faliro, how good is your Portuguese? What do you find easy and hard about it?

I find nothing too hard in Minas Gerais other than how Mineiros sometimes add words together in sentences - or chop them up... and the fact that my wife doesn't speak to me in Portuguese at home leaving me unprepared in Brazil. So every time I go to Minas, it takes me a while to get the grasp of what people are saying. I do like the way they talk in Minas Gerais, but it is quite strange also.



Portuguese from Portugal I find a lot harder to understand simply because of the accent - I find it quite abrupt and closed. I listen a lot of times to Martins talking after Olympiacos games and I understand not much other than the easy words, jogo, dificil, feliz, primeira parte etc. I was also watching a Netflix documentary and even though it was translated into English I was seeing if I could understand anything Goncarlo Amaral (former detective) was saying. I could maybe understand 5 to 10 percent of what he was saying..

As for speaking it - not so easy.. I add bits of french here and there and Latin to get by. I also guess a lot of words. For example I was talking to some Mineiros in a bar about politics for around 2 hours. Only after I left did my wife decide to inform me the word I was using for Government - 'Governmente' (I pronounced it Governmenche) - does not actually exist, and the word is in fact Governo. I assumed it was Governmente because most things in that city seem to end with a 'che' sound.  :buck2:

However it should be noted I have never had lessons in Portuguese and only like 4 in Greek in my whole life. I have never been in portugal other than in the Lisbon airport waiting for a transfer to Brazil. I studied French at school until 18. My Spanish is also crap although I am a good actor so sometimes I can impress people with very very little vocab.
« Última modificação: 02 de Abril de 2019, 21:41 por Faliro »

Festivus

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  • 02 de Abril de 2019, 22:10
Faliro, how good is your Portuguese? What do you find easy and hard about it?

I find nothing too hard in Minas Gerais other than how Mineiros sometimes add words together in sentences - or chop them up... and the fact that my wife doesn't speak to me in Portuguese at home leaving me unprepared in Brazil. So every time I go to Minas, it takes me a while to get the grasp of what people are saying. I do like the way they talk in Minas Gerais, but it is quite strange also.



Portuguese from Portugal I find a lot harder to understand simply because of the accent - I find it quite abrupt and closed. I listen a lot of times to Martins talking after Olympiacos games and I understand not much other than the easy words, jogo, dificil, feliz, primeira parte etc. I was also watching a Netflix documentary and even though it was translated into English I was seeing if I could understand anything Goncarlo Amaral (former detective) was saying. I could maybe understand 5 to 10 percent of what he was saying..

As for speaking it - not so easy.. I add bits of french here and there and Latin to get by. I also guess a lot of words. For example I was talking to some Mineiros in a bar about politics for around 2 hours. Only after I left did my wife decide to inform me the word I was using for Government - 'Governmente' (I pronounced it Governmenche) - does not actually exist, and the word is in fact Governo. I assumed it was Governmente because most things in that city seem to end with a 'che' sound.  :buck2:

However it should be noted I have never had lessons in Portuguese and only like 4 in Greek in my whole life. I have never been in portugal other than in the Lisbon airport waiting for a transfer to Brazil. I studied French at school until 18. My Spanish is also crap although I am a good actor so sometimes I can impress people with very very little vocab.

Lol you've been watching the Maddie documentary.

I've no idea how hard Portuguese is as a foreign language. Hard to judge my native tongue like that. I'd say the hardest part about it would be its phonetics. It has both open and closed vowels unlike most Romance languages. I think we're the only major Romance language with nasalised diphthongs as well. Do you have trouble pronouncing "ão", "ães" and "ões"?

I have no idea how Portuguese compares to Greek, since I know virtually nothing about Greek. But Portuguese has A LOT of different verb tenses and endings. Way more than languages like English and German have, for example. Always found it easy to conjugate verbs in English and German since they have way less different endings and also less tenses than we do. Do Greek have a lot of different verb tenses and endings?

Also, like all Romance languages, except for Romanian, Portuguese does not have a case system. Does Greek have one?

French... haven't had it since 9th grade. Always struggled with it. Found it a pain to conjugate verbs and to spell words. Unlike English which was my strongest subject since day one. I did very good at German in HS at first but then it became harder. I graduated HS without remembering any German, so I decided to attempt relearning it as an adult around 2012 or so. My German is at a pretty solid level atm. I never get the chance to speak it, though. And I find it a lot easier to read it and listen to it than actually writing it. But I guess that's how it usually works. I barely remembered what having to learn a language form scratch was like. I remembering scoring very high grades in English tests since 4th grade, but then went online and could barely type anything. Then suddenly, around 13-14 or so I stopped having that problem.

Unfortunately most languages aren't as easily accessible nor do you find yourself being "forced" to use them as much as English. So that really slows down your progress unless you move to a country where your target language is natively spoken.

German has been a very interesting experience. And I dunno if I ever want to learn any other foreign language in my life again. I'm getting older and have less time and energy for such things. At some point in my life I wanted to give Japanese a try, but it requires 3 different alphabets, with Kanji being a quite hard one to learn and master. It's a shame, since I've picked up a lot of Japanese vocabulary throughout my life from watching anime and listening to jpop. If it used a simple alphabet like Korean does I'd definitely have given it a shot already. But oh well.

Faliro

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  • 02 de Abril de 2019, 22:43

Lol you've been watching the Maddie documentary.

Yes, those expert sniffer dogs really liked the cuddly cat teddy didn't they?  :-X

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I've no idea how hard Portuguese is as a foreign language. Hard to judge my native tongue like that. I'd say the hardest part about it would be its phonetics. It has both open and closed vowels unlike most Romance languages. I think we're the only major Romance language with nasalised diphthongs as well. Do you have trouble pronouncing "ão", "ães" and "ões"?

One that really fucks me off is the difference between the sounds of pão and pau which is so fucking subtle - I just don't hear it most the time.

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I have no idea how Portuguese compares to Greek, since I know virtually nothing about Greek. But Portuguese has A LOT of different verb tenses and endings. Way more than languages like English and German have, for example. Always found it easy to conjugate verbs in English and German since they have way less different endings and also less tenses than we do. Do Greek have a lot of different verb tenses and endings?

Yes Greek has all the different endings like Portuguese on verbs and the verbs in particular would be very easy for someone who speaks a romance language to learn. For example the present of 'to want.' Like in Portuguese, you don't need to use the subject because the end of the verb indicates the person. I have put the words in latin script so you can read it.

Thelo - I want
Thelis - you want
Theli - he or she wants
Theloume - we want
Thelete - you want (plural/polite)
Theloun - They want

Easy as pie and the past tense is very easy to form.

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Also, like all Romance languages, except for Romanian, Portuguese does not have a case system. Does Greek have one?

Yes, Greeks still use the case system to an extent. Not as bad as Latin, but they do have cases.

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French... haven't had it since 9th grade. Always struggled with it. Found it a pain to conjugate verbs and to spell words. Unlike English which was my strongest subject since day one. I did very good at German in HS at first but then it became harder. I graduated HS without remembering any German, so I decided to attempt relearning it as an adult around 2012 or so. My German is at a pretty solid level atm. I never get the chance to speak it, though. And I find it a lot easier to read it and listen to it than actually writing it. But I guess that's how it usually works. I barely remembered what having to learn a language form scratch was like. I remembering scoring very high grades in English tests since 4th grade, but then went online and could barely type anything. Then suddenly, around 13-14 or so I stopped having that problem.

Yes French is very hard and it used to be forced upon many British kids like myself. I did not enjoy it. Very pretty listening to women speak it though..

German - I would not want to learn. My Grandfather even banned it being spoken by his German speaking wife because of WW2. Also I find it sounds very desperate and neurotic.

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Unfortunately most languages aren't as easily accessible nor do you find yourself being "forced" to use them as much as English. So that really slows down your progress unless you move to a country where your target language is natively spoken.

Agree completely. The reason I learnt so much portuguese was that very very few people in Minas Gerais speak English. So there is no option other than to try.

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German has been a very interesting experience. And I dunno if I ever want to learn any other foreign language in my life again. I'm getting older and have less time and energy for such things. At some point in my life I wanted to give Japanese a try, but it requires 3 different alphabets, with Kanji being a quite hard one to learn and master. It's a shame, since I've picked up a lot of Japanese vocabulary throughout my life from watching anime and listening to jpop. If it used a simple alphabet like Korean does I'd definitely have given it a shot already. But oh well.

Yea, I think I like almost everything about Japan myself. Grew up on anime too - stuff like Cyber City and before than G-Force etc. As a teen was big into the anime films and series too.

Festivus

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  • 03 de Abril de 2019, 00:35
Mate, let's not even go there ;D. The Madeleine McCann case thread has been quite active in the past few weeks with people arguing about their own theories of how the events transpired  :2funny:.

Understandable, I guess. I guess cão might sound a bit too similar to the English word cow as well?

Ah Greek is a null-subject language as well, I see.

Past tense easy to form? That's funny because in Portuguese we pretty much just use the simple past. We never use the past participle. We never say "I have eaten". We just say "Eu comi" or simply "comi". Meanwhile, Germans say "Ich habe gegessen". The simple past in German is mostly used in written form only, from what I gather.

Funny enough, there's two ways of using the past perfect in Portuguese. In spoken form we say "Eu já tinha comido" for "I had already eaten". But in literary form(in a novel, let's say) you'll find that sentence written as "Eu já havia comido" instead.

Well, cases to me were a new experience when I started German. Apparently that's the thing non-native speakers of German struggle with the most about the language but I don't think it's that complicated.

I see. Well, I like German, but it seems to be a very polarising language.

Anime here in Portugal... you'll easily find it on TV. I haven't paid attention to TV in ages, but I remember when I was a kid there being just as much anime on TV as there were American cartoons. DBZ, Captain Tsubasa, Sailor Moon, Pokémon, Saint Seiya, Speed Racer, Dogtanian, Doraemon and maybeee Naruto would be the most popular anime here. But it's considerably harder to meet people who ar self-proclaimed anime fans. Most people grew up watching DBZ and Captain Tsubasa and that's it. It's a lot harder to find someone who knows what Cowboy Bebop, Evangelion, Monster, One Piece, etc. are.

Faliro

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  • 03 de Abril de 2019, 00:49
Mate, let's not even go there ;D. The Madeleine McCann case thread has been quite active in the past few weeks with people arguing about their own theories of how the events transpired  :2funny:.

Just something very curious about those dogs. Perfect record, insanely accurate nose. Tested other apartments in the block and nothing.. Tested their apartment - immediate hit for blood and a human cadaver. And the teddy, and her clothes... and the car... they were not interested in other cars.. just theirs..  Something is not right.. No idea what happened, but I believe whatever did, probably happened in the apartment.

Schweisen Tiger

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  • 06 de Abril de 2019, 15:30
Portuguese is actually hard to understand, to people who are native in languages that don't use same style fonetics, nor tongue/mouth articulation while speaking. Portuguese tongue articulation it's similar to some eatern europe languages like polish, and russian. That's why russian, ukranians, polish and balcanics seem to find not so hard to learn portuguese in a short period of time. Even for spanish people, it's hard to understand portuguese, if we speak it on our normal accent and speed. They say we speak a lot faster than them, and with our mouths almost closed, which turns the sound hard to understand.

Covenant

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  • 14 de Abril de 2019, 05:11
It will be tough in the Play-offs for Olympiakos (basket).

Faliro

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  • 14 de Abril de 2019, 23:21
It will be tough in the Play-offs for Olympiakos (basket).

Man I have not been following the basket. There was a lot this week about Marinakis being happy to take over the Olympiacos basketball section.. :huh: So I assume some bad stuff happened this season in our basketball section.

Kaká

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  • 21 de Abril de 2019, 01:31
Portuguese is actually hard to understand, to people who are native in languages that don't use same style fonetics, nor tongue/mouth articulation while speaking. Portuguese tongue articulation it's similar to some eatern europe languages like polish, and russian. That's why russian, ukranians, polish and balcanics seem to find not so hard to learn portuguese in a short period of time. Even for spanish people, it's hard to understand portuguese, if we speak it on our normal accent and speed. They say we speak a lot faster than them, and with our mouths almost closed, which turns the sound hard to understand.

Even some Brazillians I met, tell me that European Portuguese is hard to grasp most of the times.
I have seen that a European Portuguese when it ears (from a distance, without paying atention) Russian, Polish, or a Slavik Language it oftens thinks that those people are speaking Portuguese, because of the sound that they ear.

We have the habit to "eat" specific sounds from the words ( the eat expression is a European Portuguese Slang or used as sarcasm, we use it when we want to describe something that is missing: "can't find this x"; "have you eaten it?" )

Faliro

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  • 21 de Abril de 2019, 21:16



'τι φασαρια γινεται εκει χαμηλα;' = 'What the fuck is going on down there?'

'Oyφ! Eπιτέλους! 93 χρονια απο την ιδρυση μου εφτασα!' = 'Ouf! At last! After 93 years since my founding, I arrived!'


Crazy Mary

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  • 26 de Abril de 2019, 22:03
It will be tough in the Play-offs for Olympiakos (basket).

Man I have not been following the basket. There was a lot this week about Marinakis being happy to take over the Olympiacos basketball section.. :huh: So I assume some bad stuff happened this season in our basketball section.


Faliro, out of curiosity, and sorry if this has been asked before, but can you understand portuguese if you read it, as opposed to listening to it?